HealthiQuiz

Only a Nutrition Know-It-All Could Get a 9/9 on This Quiz

Can you guess the answers to these diet head-scratchers?

1/9
QUESTION 1

Which bread is healthier: multigrain or whole wheat?

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Whole-y moly!

The healthier pick comes down to one word: whole. A whole grain contains three important parts: bran, germ, and endosperm. The bran is full of fiber and acts like a shield, which protects the inside of the grain. The germ is where most of the key vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants live, and the endosperm is where the carbs and proteins live. Refined grains (like white bread) are stripped of most of the bran and some of the germ, leaving it, well, less than whole and lacking all those key nutrients.

Multigrain breads may be better than refined varieties, but they’re often not healthy as they sound. Why? All the “multi” means is that the bread contains many different grains, like rye, barley or millet, but (here’s the kicker) those grains may not necessarily be whole.

Here’s how to pick the healthiest loaf in the bread aisle:

2/9
QUESTION 2

Eating whole eggs will cause your cholesterol levels to spike.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Eggs-cellent news!

Surprised? While it’s true that each egg yolk contains 200 mg of cholesterol, that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to see your cholesterol levels spike if you top your breakfast sammie with a runny egg. Here’s why:

3/9
QUESTION 3

Turkey bacon is healthier than pork bacon.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

No bacon is healthy bacon (sorry).

Both types of bacon are high in saturated fat and sodium. Eating just 2 ounces of either turkey or pork bacon brings you close to the American Heart Association's 2,300-milligram sodium limit for the day (for optimal heart health, aim for no more than 1,500 milligrams). Both bacon varieties are not healthy foods, especially for your heart, and should be eaten sparingly (less than once a week).

4/9
QUESTION 4

Celery has negative calories, since you burn more cals chewing than you take in.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Myth, busted!

While it may seem feasible, since celery is so low in calories and it takes quite a bit of chewing (and digesting) to break it down, the math just doesn’t add up. Chewing burns about 11 calories an hour—and it definitely doesn’t take an hour to chew that celery stalk.

5/9
QUESTION 5

You should try to sip diet soda instead of regular to lose weight.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Stop mid-sip, and hear this.

Diet sodas may be low in calories and free of the refined white sugar and high-fructose corn syrup that’s in the regular stuff, but that doesn’t mean drinking it is doing your diet (or health) any favors. Drinking diet soda may actually cause sneaky weight gain in the long-term. For one thing, the fact that it’s labeled “diet” may make you think you’re saving calories and then feel like you have a pass to eat more food. What’s more, artificial sweeteners—found in many diet sodas—have also been associated with weight gain without extra food intake, as well as an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome.

6/9
QUESTION 6

How often should you be eating per day?

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Eat when your body needs it.

Eating frequent small meals throughout the day may keep you from getting too hungry (and noshing on unhealthy eats later), but when it comes to determining what meal frequency is healthiest, the medical literature is mixed, says Sharon Richter, RD, a registered dietitian based in New York City. “[It] probably depends more on your personal preference and what works for your lifestyle.”

If you’re a natural grazer and do better when you don’t let yourself get too hungry, then go ahead and eat smaller meals more often. If your body craves more at mealtimes and you can go longer without eating, then do that. Whatever your pleasure, just make sure you’re paying attention to hunger cues and calorie intake—and only eating when your body needs it.

7/9
QUESTION 7

If you plan on eating a big meal later, fast before to save calories.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Fasting won’t do you any favors.

While it may seem like you’re “saving up” calories to nosh at dinnertime by skipping breakfast and lunch, the math isn’t that simple.

For one thing, if you don’t eat all day, you’ll probably end up making poor (read: high-calorie) food choices later on simply because you’re starving.

You also know (or just learned from Question 6) that eating mini meals throughout the day can help prevent that from happening. What’s more, studies have shown that eating breakfast can actually result in fewer calories eaten throughout the day.  

The bottom line? Fasting won’t help your health, since you’ll probably end up feasting a little too hard. If you want to indulge later, fill up on low-calorie, high-fiber foods, like fruit, veggies and whole grains until the big meal.

8/9
QUESTION 8

You should cut out carbs if you want to lose weight or be healthier.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Don’t ditch those carbs just yet!

The good news is that you don’t need to give carbs the boot to be healthy—if you’re eating the right kind. Simple carbs, like in white bread, pasta, and cookies, are easily broken down by the body, which means that they can spike your blood sugar. They may give you a quick energy boost, but lack nutrition. Complex carbs, including whole grains, vegetables, and legumes, take longer for your body to digest so they have less of a spiking effect on blood sugar. Complex carbs also have more vitamins, more minerals, and more fiber, which slows digestion and can help keep you full.

9/9
QUESTION 9

Blended smoothies provide as much fiber as whole fruits and veggies.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Sip, sip away!

Smoothie lovers, rejoice! Sipping on a strawberry-banana smoothie has just as much fiber as eating the whole fruits. Here’s why: Fiber doesn’t get digested, but instead passes through your system more or less intact to help move other foods through your system effectively. So if your molars, stomach acid, and digestive tract can’t even break fiber down, neither can your blender.

Quiz Results

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Reviewed by: Preeti Parikh, MD, . Review date: Jan. 26, 2018
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