HealthiQuiz

Can You Guess If These Whole Grain Claims Are Fact or Fiction?

Darker doesn’t always mean healthier.

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QUESTION 1

Flour and bread are “empty carbs” and you should steer clear if you’re trying to lose weight.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

No one single food causes obesity.

Weight management depends on your overall diet and lifestyle. In moderation, even white bread can fit into a healthful diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and legumes. Consider the French, who are known for serving white bread and baguettes with their meals, but have an obesity rate of 15.3 percent (compared to America’s obesity rate of 38.2 percent). Of course, eating too many calories from any food will influence weight.

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QUESTION 2

Refined flour loses two important parts of the grain: the bran and germ.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Only the endosperm is left.

The health goodies of a wheat kernel lie in the bran and germ, and these parts get stripped away when flour is refined. That’s because the bran and germ give flour a heartier texture and stronger flavor than white flour, and many people have developed a taste preference for the latter.

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QUESTION 3

“Wheat,” “whole wheat,” and “unbleached” are interchangeable terms for the same thing.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

They all mean something different.

Food companies might hope you don’t know or care about the difference between “unbleached” and “whole wheat,” but each of these terms means something a little different. For example, unbleached flour has still been refined and no longer has the nutritious parts of the grain—namely, the bran and germ. Don’t be fooled by a bread or pasta’s brown color. You still need to read the food label and ingredient list to see whether the grains are whole.

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QUESTION 4

People with diabetes should avoid eating grains because they cause blood sugar spikes.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Whole grains actually help blood sugar management.

Yep, refined grains (like white bread, pasta, or rice) can spike glucose levels in the blood, especially when you eat large portions. However, whole grains packed with fiber can keep levels more steady (as well as help you feel more full). The American Diabetes Association recommends making half your grains whole—the same goal that MyPlate recommends to ALL Americans.

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QUESTION 5

Multigrain bread is better than whole-wheat bread because it contains a variety of nutritious grains.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Look for “100% whole grain” on your label

Multigrain or 7-grain breads do contain a mix of good-for-you grains and seeds, but the main flour is often still white, refined flour. That’s bad news for your body because refined flour lacks the fiber that whole-wheat flour has, and the average American only gets about half of the daily recommended fiber intake. Your best bet is to look for a bread labeled “100% whole grain” or “100% whole wheat.”

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QUESTION 6

Popcorn is a whole grain.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Everyone’s favorite movie snack is totally whole.

Popcorn is a whole corn kernel, and the “pop” doesn’t strip away the nutritional perks. Be careful here: Some popcorn comes with a mega load of butter or salt. These ingredients are both tough on the heart, raising blood cholesterol levels and blood pressure. When possible, choose air-popped popcorn to get your whole grains without the saturated fat and sodium.

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QUESTION 7

Whole white wheat flour is a whole grain and a healthy option.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

It’s a different type of wheat.

It’s natural to be wary of whole white wheat flour, but this product is actually a different type of wheat than most of our whole-wheat products. Whole white wheat flour still has its bran and germ, which have a lighter color than the red wheat kernels you’re probably used to. Bonus: Whole white wheat flour is lighter and more neutral-flavored than regular whole-wheat flour, so it might remind you of regular ol’ white bread.

Quiz Results

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Reviewed by: Preeti Parikh, MD, . Review date: Jan. 18, 2018
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