HealthiQuiz

Only a Wannabe Cardiologist Could Get a 7/7 on This Cholesterol Quiz

How much do you know about maintaining healthy cholesterol levels?

1/7
QUESTION 1

Eating high-cholesterol foods is the main dietary cause of high cholesterol.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

It’s not that simple.

Cholesterol comes from two sources: Your body (specifically your liver) and the foods you eat. Interestingly enough, cholesterol that comes from foods doesn’t seem to have a big impact on your blood cholesterol levels. What does? Saturated fats, which are found in high-fat dairy and fatty cuts of meat, and trans fats, which are found in fried food and pastries, like French fries, pizza dough, and cookies. These foods cause your liver to make more cholesterol than it should. For some people, this boost in production can cause their cholesterol levels to go from healthy to unhealthy.

2/7
QUESTION 2

The higher your HDL cholesterol, the greater your risk of heart disease.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

More HDL = Healthy

There are two main kinds of cholesterol in the blood: LDL is what many doctors refer to as “bad” cholesterol, which can build up and clog your blood vessels, and HDL is known as “good” cholesterol, which helps get clear bad cholesterol from your arteries. A healthy HDL cholesterol level is 60 or higher; this may protect against heart attack and stroke. Studies show low levels of HDL cholesterol may actually increase your risk of heart disease.

Your goal LDL number should be less than 100. Triglycerides, another measure of fat in the blood, should be less than 150.

3/7
QUESTION 3

Statins help improve your blood cholesterol levels by which of the following methods?

Select All That Apply
Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Stellar statins!

To treat high cholesterol, your doctor might recommend statins, a class of drugs that block cholesterol formation in the liver. Statins are the most well-studied medication available to help lower “bad” LDL cholesterol levels and raise “good” HDL levels, which can slow the formation of plaque in the arteries. Many studies have shown that treating high cholesterol with statins can also decrease your risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.

4/7
QUESTION 4

Which of these not-so-healthy habits can lower levels “good” HDL cholesterol?

Select All That Apply
Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

The salty truth

Smoking, lack of exercise, and being overweight are all controllable causes of low levels of “good” HDL cholesterol. Quitting smoking, moving more (40 minutes a day, a few times a week) and losing just 10 percent of your weight (if you need to), can lower cholesterol levels—or even reverse it.

A diet that’s high in sodium is associated with high blood pressure, which is also a major risk factor for heart disease.

5/7
QUESTION 5

You should start getting your cholesterol checked at age 20.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

Get checked at 20, especially if you’re at risk for heart disease.

The American Heart Association recommends that all adults age 20 or older have their cholesterol checked every four to six years. People who smoke, have diabetes or have a family history of high cholesterol or heart disease may need to get checked more often.

6/7
QUESTION 6

The most common symptoms of high cholesterol are _____________.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

High cholesterol signs are silent.

High cholesterol usually doesn’t not cause any specific symptoms. Some people with severe levels of high cholesterol may show signs of xanthomas, which are yellow, fat-filled nodules on the body, or corneal arcus, which are grayish-white rings around the eyes. Untreated or undiagnosed high cholesterol can lead to heart attack or stroke, which is why regular screenings are important.

7/7
QUESTION 7

High cholesterol isn’t usually a concern for children.

Please Select an Answer.
Correct
Wrong

It’s not just for adults.

High cholesterol can occur children, and this is more common now due to rising levels of obesity among school-age kids. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends all children between 9 and 11 years old get screened for high blood cholesterol levels.

Children who may be at increased risk of high cholesterol because of a family history (if a parent or grandparent has history of high cholesterol, or has coronary atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease or cerebrovascular disease, or who had a heart attack or sudden cardiac death before age 55) may need to get their cholesterol tested even younger.

Quiz Results

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Reviewed by: Preeti Parikh, MD, . Review date: Feb. 12, 2018
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