HealthHealth | Diabetic Diet | April 27, 2018 | By Rachel Meltzer Warren, MS, RDN

Here are 7 Diabetes-Friendly Dishes to Order at McDonald’s

It’s more than possible make a pit stop at the Golden Arches without blowing your diabetic diet.

Here are 7 Diabetes-Friendly Dishes to Order at McDonald’s

iStock Unreleased / Getty Images Plus / Remus Kotsell



With 37,000 McDonald’s locations around the world, there’s a solid chance at some point you’ll find yourself in one, looking for a meal that won’t send your blood sugar soaring. Good news—the McDonald’s menu isn’t all supersized Cokes and fries anymore (the chain actually discontinued those infamous mega portions in 2004).

Do a little nutrition sleuthing—and McDonald’s makes it easy to research nutrition information on their website—and you’ll find plenty of meal options that will keep your numbers in check.

If you have diabetes, you’ll want to aim for around 400-500 calories, 45-60 grams of carbohydrates, and fewer than 10% of calories from saturated fat per meal. You also want to look for foods that make a dent in your daily fiber goal: 25 grams for women and 38 for men. Keeping sodium to a minimum is also important. The American Heart Association recommends getting no more than 2,300 milligram per day. Meals out are some of the biggest sources of sodium; so be sure to keep salt extra low the rest of the day any time you eat out.

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The following seven meals will help you stay within range of your diabetes meal goals at Mickey D’s:


McDonald’s Corporation



1. Egg McMuffin + Latte

The classic breakfast sandwich paired with a milky coffee is a satiating, energy-boosting meal to start your day with. You’ll have the option to go with whole or nonfat milk for the latte; while some research links full-fat dairy consumption with a lower risk of diabetes and healthier blood lipid levels, the American Diabetes Association still recommends low or non-fat for people with diabetes. Whichever one you choose, the latte will deliver 25% of your daily calcium need.

Nutrition information: 440 calories, 19 g fat, 10 g saturated fat, 265 mg cholesterol, 830 mg sodium, 41 g carbohydrates, 14 g sugars, 2 g fiber, 25 g protein


McDonald’s Corporation



2. Sausage burrito + Fruit 'N Yogurt Parfait (minus the granola)

Ask for your parfait sans granola—between the sweetened yogurt and the berries, you don’t need the extra hit of sweetness (and two forms of sugar—brown and corn syrup) you’d get from the granola. Even without it, this combo hits all of the sweet/savory notes to create a blood sugar-balancing breakfast.

Nutrition information:420 calories, 17 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 170 mg cholesterol, 810 mg sodium, 51 g carbohydrates, 21 g sugars, 2 g fiber, 16 g protein



McDonald’s Corporation



3. Hamburger + kids fries + 1 packet of ketchup

This classic McDonald’s combo is actually A-OK for a diabetes-friendly meal, as long as you keep the fries serving small. You can stay within healthy range by ordering a kid’s portion—or sharing a small order with a friend. Keep the ketchup to one packet; at 2 grams of carbohydrates per packet, the carbs can add up quickly.

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Nutrition information:370 calories, 13 g fat, 4 g saturated fat, 30 mg cholesterol, 650 mg sodium, 48 g carbohydrates, 8 g sugars, 3 g fiber, 14 g protein


McDonald’s Corporation



4. Artisan Grilled Chicken Sandwich + side salad

Opting for a grilled chicken sandwich rather than a fried one keeps the calories and fat down; adding in the salad provides you with nearly 100% of your daily need of vision-protecting vitamin A, not to mention fiber and texture. The nutrition information listed below doesn’t include dressing for the salad; opt for a low-fat option (they’re much lower in calorie than McDonald’s full-fat offerings) and keep your portion of the dressing to a drizzle.

Nutrition information: 400 calories, 7 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 95 mg cholesterol, 1130 mg sodium, 47 g carbohydrates, 12 g sugars, 4 g fiber, 38 g protein


McDonald’s Corporation



5. Southwest Grilled Chicken Salad + kids fries

Made with seasoned chicken, roasted corn and tomatoes, poblano peppers, and shredded cheese, this salad has plenty of flavor before you add the dressing—so much, in fact, that you could probably go without any dressing. Dressed or undressed, this meal will provide you with more than your daily need for vitamin A and more than half of your vitamin C requirement. All that, and there’s still room for a kid-sized fries!

Nutrition information:470 calories, 17 g fat, 5 g saturated fat, 110 mg cholesterol, 1150 mg sodium, 42 g carbohydrates, 9 g sugars, 7 g fiber, 38 g protein


McDonald’s Corporation



6. Double Cheeseburger + apple slices

If it’s a big burger you crave, opt for a Double Cheeseburger rather than a Big Mac or Quarter Pounder with cheese. The reason: You’ll get similar flavor without all of the extra bread or beef. It is still a lot of saturated fat-rich meat and cheese, however—so balance them out with an order of apple slices on the side.

Nutrition information:450 calories, 21 g fat, 11 g saturated fat, 85 mg cholesterol, 1040 mg sodium, 39 g carbohydrates, 10 g sugars, 2 g fiber, 25 g protein


McDonald’s Corporation



7. Chicken McNuggets (4 pieces) + small fries + side salad

An order of Chicken McNuggets is lower in carbohydrates than any sandwich you’ll get at McDonald’s—which means you can get a small order of fries all to yourself (woo hoo!). If you don’t mind some heat, request the Spicy Buffalo Sauce as your dip—it will add only 30 calories and 1 gram of carbohydrates (by comparison, Sweet ‘N Sour and Tangy Barbecue sauces both pack 11 grams of carbs per serving). However, the meal is missing one thing: color! Add in a side salad, which adds 2 grams of fiber, not to mention vitamins A, C, and disease-fighting antioxidants—all for a mere 20 calories.

Nutrition information:420 calories, 22 g fat, 3.5 g saturated fat, 30 mg cholesterol, 510 mg sodium, 43 g carbohydrates, 2 g sugars, 5 g fiber, 14 g protein


Eating with Diabetes: 7 Rules for a Healthy Diet
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Reviewed by: Preeti Parikh, MD . Review date: April 25, 2018
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