HIV | Drug Treatment Guide

Genvoya

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Genvoya

Punkaj Khanna, Pharm. D. Punkaj Khanna earned his Pharm.D. from Massachusetts College of Pharmacy. He works at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and has special interests in patient education and compliance.
Video Description

Pharmacist Punkaj Khanna overviews Genvoya, a prescription drug used to treat HIV. Following this overview, if you would like to know more about Genvoya or have any questions, talk with your doctor.

Genvoya is a combination of four different drugs in one pill. These drugs are Cobicistat, Elvitegravir, Emtricitabine, Tenofovir and Alafenamide. Genvoya is prescribed to people who have been diagnosed with HIV but have not yet treated the infection. In some cases, Genvoya can replace a current treatment plan for HIV if you have a viral load of less than 50 copies per mL for at least 6 months and have never failed a treatment.

It is an antiviral medication that aims to slow the progression of the infection throughout the body. Genvoya does not cure HIV nor does it stop the spread of the disease that is passed through bodily fluids like blood. Make sure you never have unprotected sex and never share objects like toothbrushes, razors, or needles. It is also important to make regular doctor visits and get your blood and urine checked.

You will need to be tested for Hepatitis B before starting a treatment with Genvoya. You will also want to tell your doctor if you have any allergies to food or medicines, if you have kidney disease, or if you are taking any other drugs, specifically ones to treat HIV.

Genvoya comes in a pill and is generally taken with food. Use this drug as prescribed by your doctor. Usually this means one pill taken by mouth once a day. You should not take any antacids within two hours of taking this drug. You may start to feel better on Genvoya, but it is important that you not stop treatment nor miss a dose.

Your doctor may also prescribe calcium and vitamin D supplements. It is important to be aware of the side effects that may come with a medication.

Talk to your doctor about your HIV treatment plan and experience. If you are not satisfied with your treatment, you and your doctor can work together to create a plan that works best for you.

 

Duration: 03:22 Last Updated On: 2016-02-08